Home > IRQ, USA > Today’s Iraqi informers replicate the infamous role of their counterparts under Saddam Hussein

Today’s Iraqi informers replicate the infamous role of their counterparts under Saddam Hussein

January 10, 2011

The following article is from Iraqi newspaper Azzaman.

Today’s Iraqi informers replicate the infamous role of their counterparts under Saddam Hussein
©  Azzaman
By Fatih Abdulsalam
January 9, 2011

The Iraqi parliament is debating the role secret intelligence agents play in the current Iraqi political scene. These agents are euphemistically called informers, the appellation the former regime of Saddam Hussein also used.

The issue of secret intelligence agents has become a stigma of disgrace in the forehead of the current political system in Iraq. The governments that have come to rule the country in the aftermath of the 2003-U.S. invasion have nurtured these informers and even bragged about their pervasive presence.

Iraqis had thought that the U.S. would ‘liberate’ them from Saddam Hussein’s secret intelligence agents whose reports and presence almost everybody feared to death.

Little did they know that the post-Saddam era would replicate the same experience and in cases in ways that surpass in their oppression the pre-U.S. invasion epoch.

The secret informers who emerged in the past seven years are protected by law. They can say and do whatever they want with impunity even if their reports lead to the execution of innocent Iraqis.

The prerogatives they have under current regulations and rules are tantamount to those dictators bestow on themselves. Secret informers have become an integral part of the ruling political classes in Iraq.

It is sad and unfortunate to see the parliament failing to reach an agreement on how to annul the rules under which these informers act. A revision of these rules is more likely.

But the revisions under consideration are merely cosmetic and the surgery will fail to decorate the informers’ ugly faces.

Informers in Iraq have been used for the liquidation of political opponents; hence the stigma of disgrace, vice and shame they have brought to the whole political structure in the country.

The victims of the army of informers in Iraq include university professors, doctors, engineers, military personnel, craftsmen, lawyers and merchants. Many of them have disappeared in the dungeons of the secret jails built in the post U.S. ‘liberation’ of the country.

[End.]

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Categories: IRQ, USA